Sunday, February 3, 2013

Selwicks-Bay-8996-2

Selwicks-Bay-8996-2
accent car photo
Image by HJSP82
This is processed in Lightroom 3.
The 2 anglers didn't catch anything!
I seem to spend a good deal of my days at Flamborough, well I was practically brought up there. I often used to go out fishing with the Emmerson Bros. who were running "Silver Line". They all had a very broad accent and went to Church on Sundays. Here is a film taken by my Stepfather Geo Bayes, who was then the Lifeboat Secretary. He was also a local fish merchant, restaraunter and hotelier.

LITTLE DENMARK PART 1 (1957)
www.yfaonline.com/film/little-denmark-part-1?destination=...
This film is part of two long films made by local filmmaker George Bayes of Flamborough and Flamborough Head. The films are mainly dedicated to the work of the coast guard and especially the Royal Navy Lifeboat Institute (RNFI). But they also provide a picture of Flamborough at the time, with marvellous film of the sea fishing, showing many of the well known locals from that period.

The name of “Little Denmark” goes back a long way. One explanation is that it is to celebrate Flamborough’s former loyalty to the Danish crown. The name of Flamborough is also said to be derived from the Scandinavian word “Flan”, meaning a spit or tongue of land. Some have commented on the Danish influence going back to the invasion of the 9th century: seen in local place names and the dialect of the inhabitants. However, Danes’ Dyke is a natural formation, and nothing to do with the Danes.

Flamborough Head lies at the tip of the most eastern peninsula, and is famous as a beauty spot and for the nearby Bird Reserve at Bempton Cliffs. It is remarkably unchanged since this film was made, with the Coastguard lookout station and two lighthouses still in place. The first lighthouse, a white octagonal tower, dating from 1674, is probably the oldest surviving lighthouse in England. It started off as a way of making money, by Sir John Clayton charging vessels passing the headland. It is not clear whether this scheme ever worked. It stopped working as a lighthouse some time ago. The second lighthouse (the new lighthouse) was built in 1806 and vertically extended in 1925.

The RNFI was initially set up as a charity was founded by Sir William Hillary as the National Institution for the Preservation of Life from Shipwreck in 1824, after he had witnessed the wrecking of dozens of ships from his home on the Isle of Man. The name was changed to the Royal National Lifeboat Institution in 1854, and cork lifejackets were first issued to crew members in the same year. By and large the crews are voluntary crewed, though there are four full time boats, one just a bit further along the Yorkshire coast at Spurn Point. All told it has 40,000 volunteers. Since its foundation the RNLI has saved more than 139,000 lives.

In 1992 the rigid lifeboat was replaced by an inflatable one, but as the North Landing – home of the Caravel Bar –was considered too dangerous for an inflatable it was moved to the South Landing. Apparently this move caused a huge schism in the community, with most of the original crew resigning. Since then
the entire station’s emergency search and rescue team and all the emergency equipment has been moved to Bridlington coastguard station. The South Landing was declared a local nature reserve in 2002. At the time of writing (May 2010), there is a Campaign to Save Flamborough Head Coastguard Station From Closure! The website (see References) also gives some examples of the work of the local coastguard

The area and sea around has a rich history. One particular episode of great significance was a sea battle during the American War of Independence, in 1779. This was between ships of the Royal Navy and American ships under John Paul Jones, who has been credited as being the founder of the American Navy (and also inspired the great ex bass player of Led Zeppelin to adopt the name). The excellent Yorkshire Guide website (see References) has a good overview of Flamborough and Flamborough Head, and its history.

The film demonstrates, as does the evident passion of the narrator, that for the filmmakers there is more at stake than just saving lives. The film provides a great example of what Pierre Nora calls ‘sites of memory’. One way that this has been encapsulated is in the tradition of sword dancing, as seen here with this young group of dancers. This tradition has a strong connection to East Yorkshire – see Kirkby Malzeard Sword Dancers (1930-32). But it is the place itself, and the of the sea crashing against the rocks, that perhaps makes it stay in most people’s minds.

A film documenting the work of the R.N.L.I at Flamborough, the film also shows a day in the life of working fishermen out of Flamborough.

The film opens with shots of Flamborough Bay followed by an introduction to the contributors who are shown in close up.

There is footage of the outskirts of Flamborough followed by scenes of the village including St Oswald’s Church, ruins of Flamborough Castle, and the War Memorial where a British Legion Service of Commemoration takes place. Service members lay a poppy wreath on the memorial. Views of Flamborough High Street include the Royal Dog and Duck Hotel, and the Ship Hotel. Many cars can be seen in the village, and a lady walks by pushing a pram.

The next scene features the Fishermen’s War Memorial and a Flamborough Sword Dance display. This is followed by a view of Flamborough Head where both the old and new lighthouse can be seen, and the lighthouse keepers are introduced. Views of South landing and the old lifeboat hut can be seen, and there are families enjoying the sandy beach.

A crowd is gathered at the North Landing for the annual Lifeboat Flag Day. People in fancy dress and crowds gather to watch the demonstration launch of the lifeboat. A helicopter drops a flare as part of the event.

The next portion of the film focuses on the fishermen who make their livelihood out of Flamborough. The day’s catch of crabs and lobsters are hauled up the beach at Flamborough and loaded on to vans. George Emerson and his brother show us a day in the life of their fishing vessel, the Silver Line. At sea they haul in baskets of lobsters and crabs. Back on shore, they bate the lines with mussels and whelks for the next day. Out on the boat there is long lining for cod and haddock. The fish are then prepared for gutting, and the livers are kept for cod liver oil. Seagulls swarm around the boat as it heads for the North Landing to bring in the day’s catch.



THE EGG HARVEST - CLIFF CLIMBING AT FLAMBOROUGH (1908)

Filmed in 1908, this film shows a group of men, known as climmers, who collect eggs from bird nests on the cliffs at Flamborough.

www.yfaonline.com/film/egg-harvest-cliff-climbing-flambor...

Many thanks to The Yorkshire Film Archive
www.yfaonline.com/


Exposure0.033 sec (1/30)
Aperturef/16.0
Focal Length17 mm
ISO Speed100
LensEF17-40mm f/4L USM


View large
www.flickr.com/photos/hjsp8/6818908434/sizes/o/in/photost...


o hello
accent car photo
Image by maureen_sill
this looks better if you enlarge it

being at school is incredibly weird, in a setting that feels terrible at times
a place with big stores and cars and people in nice clothes, isn't this what i tried to leave in the first place?
i took the minibus home to my mama's house and she was waiting for me on the porch
kissed me on the cheek and
brought me inside to the hiv/aids support group meeting
i did not sit in the corner, i sat on the couch in the middle this time, my sixth time
most of the same people but this time also
a man who came to the clinic today that stayed afterwards to talk to me
we sat on the porch, on flimsy lawn chairs
i watched a dog licking an empty plastic food container across the street
i watched ants crawling out of it
it's ear was bleeding, on the side, a lot, it was dried a little, into it's brown fur
no one was paying attention to it
the man who stayed after to talk to me was a friend of a friend's, said mama
he told me how he was raped in prison, and this is how he contracted hiv
he went into very graphic detail and spoke very slowly, talking about the skin of the man that raped him
how it felt in his ankles, he told me it hurt his ankles
the way that the man was doing it
he told me how it felt with one syllable adjectives, in english, in seemlingly hundred syllable adjectives, in xhosa
i felt like my blood slowed down, the theme of this entire experience
he said, mama thandiwe says you take very good photos, like your pictures could be in the newspaper!
i said, she is just saying that because she likes me
you can take my picture if you want, for yourself
i said, it's okay, i just want to talk to you if that is okay
i didn't deserve to take his picture
it wouldn't have looked right
i could tell it wouldn't have been right, so i didn't bother
i could tell, it wouldn't have been what i wanted it to be, and it would have killed me
to show him as anything less than gentle, or sweet
he zipped up his jacket
i looked at the whiskers on his face
he said he went to jail for ten years for selling drugs, he said he never did drugs once himself
he said, the white kids in the nice schools, they love coke, and he said, the black kids in the bad schools, they love tick
what is tick, i said
he said, i think americans call it meth
i said, oh
then he made fun of my american accent and then
he said, what else was i to do
he drank a cup of hot tea that i made for him with milk and sugar
he crossed his legs very well and he said he did not ever feel sorry for himself
only for his country, in general
he said, now that the president of south africa has stepped down from his position this past weekend
because of charges of corruption and because of party pressure
you are going to be in for a very interesting time in south africa
(as if i wasn't already, i thought)
he said, there might be riots
my mama said, some people are upset, but there won't be riots
he said again, there could be riots, do not ever say there will not be riots in south africa, you will be selling the people short, there is a big protest tomorrow
i said nothing and got him some more tea
i pet the dog with the broken ear
mama said do not pet the dogs they will bite you
i folded the tablecloth
i re-filled the free condom dispenser by the front door
i did the dishes
i played twenty questions with nelisa
i don't know
it's very satisfying to me, to type or write "i don't know", "i don't understand"
a form of three word relief


The Making of Harry Potter 29-05-2012
accent car photo
Image by Karen Roe
Umbridge's Ministry of Magic Office
Dolores Umbridge's Ministry of Magic office in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 1 retains many of Umbridge's nuances that were featured in her Defence Against the Dark Arts office at Hogwarts in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. Among these are her gaudy pink motif and her love of ornate furniture, which set decorators found at a Middle Eastern furniture shop tucked away in North London.

The Kitten Plates
Umbridge's decorative plates scampered to life with dozens of felines, thanks to the work of the Prop and Visual Effects Departments.
For this effect, one prop buyer journeyed all over London, acquiring and stacking hundreds of plates in the back of her tiny car. Then, one of the Second Unit's most memorable days was filming all of the cats from white kittens to peculiar-looking hairless breeds with goldfish bowls, crystal balls, miniature witches hats and other cute props.
By using chroma green paint on the plates, the Visual Effects team was able to insert the cat footage during post-production.

Shades of Pink
As she gained more and more power at the Ministry of Magic, Dolores Umbridge's wardrobe got progressively pinker, as did the pink accents on the clothing of her workers.

People the world-over have been enchanted by the Harry Potter films for nearly a decade. The wonderful special effects and amazing creatures have made this iconic series beloved to both young and old - and now, for the first time, the doors are going to be opened for everyone at the studio where it first began. You'll have the chance to go behind-the-scenes and see many things the camera never showed. From breathtakingly detailed sets to stunning costumes, props and animatronics, Warner Bros. Studio Tour London provides a unique showcase of the extraordinary British artistry, technology and talent that went into making the most successful film series of all time. Secrets will be revealed.

Warner Bros. Studio Tour London provides an amazing new opportunity to explore the magic of the Harry Potter films - the most successful film series of all time. This unique walking tour takes you behind-the-scenes and showcases a huge array of beautiful sets, costumes and props. It also reveals some closely guarded secrets, including facts about the special effects and animatronics that made these films so hugely popular all over the world.

Here are just some of the things you can expect to see and do:
- Step inside and discover the actual Great Hall.
- Explore Dumbledore’s office and discover never-before-seen treasures.
- Step onto the famous cobbles of Diagon Alley, featuring the shop fronts of Ollivanders wand shop, Flourish and Blotts, the Weasleys' Wizard Wheezes, Gringotts Wizarding Bank and Eeylops Owl Emporium.
- See iconic props from the films, including Harry’s Nimbus 2000 and Hagrid’s motorcycle.
- Learn how creatures were brought to life with green screen effects, animatronics and life-sized models.
- Rediscover other memorable sets from the film series, including the Gryffindor common room, the boys’ dormitory, Hagrid’s hut, Potion’s classroom and Professor Umbridge’s office at the Ministry of Magic.

Located just 20 miles from the heart of London at Warner Bros. Studios Leavesden, the very place where it all began and where all eight of the Harry Potter films were brought to life. The Studio Tour is accessible to everyone and promises to be a truly memorable experience - whether you’re an avid Harry Potter fan, an all-round movie buff or you just want to try something that’s a little bit different.

The tour is estimated to take approximately three hours (I was in there for 5 hours!), however, as the tour is mostly self guided, you are free to explore the attraction at your own pace. During this time you will be able to see many of the best-loved sets and exhibits from the films. Unique and precious items from the films will also be on display, alongside some exciting hands-on interactive exhibits that will make you feel like you’re actually there.

The magic also continues in the Gift Shop, which is full of exciting souvenirs and official merchandise, designed to create an everlasting memory of your day at Warner Bros. Studio Tour London.

Hogwarts Castle Model - Get a 360 degree view of the incredible, hand sculpted 1:24 scale construction that features within the Studio Tour. The Hogwarts castle model is the jewel of the Art Department having been built for the first film, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone. It took 86 artists and crew members to construct the first version which was then rebuilt and altered many times over for the next seven films. The work was so extensive that if one was to add all the man hours that have gone into building and reworking the model, it would come to over 74 years. The model was used for aerial photography, and was digitally scanned for CGI scenes.

The model, which sits at nearly 50 feet in diameter, has over 2,500 fibre optic lights that simulate lanterns and torches and even gave the illusion of students passing through hallways in the films. To show off the lighting to full effect a day-to-night cycle will take place every four minutes so you can experience its full beauty.

An amazing amount of detail went into the making of the model: all the doors are hinged, real plants are used for landscaping and miniature birds are housed in the Owlery. To make the model appear even more realistic, artists rebuilt miniature versions of the courtyards from Alnwick Castle and Durham Cathedral, where scenes from Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone were shot.


The Making of Harry Potter 29-05-2012
accent car photo
Image by Karen Roe
Umbridge's Ministry of Magic Office
Dolores Umbridge's Ministry of Magic office in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 1 retains many of Umbridge's nuances that were featured in her Defence Against the Dark Arts office at Hogwarts in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. Among these are her gaudy pink motif and her love of ornate furniture, which set decorators found at a Middle Eastern furniture shop tucked away in North London.

The Kitten Plates
Umbridge's decorative plates scampered to life with dozens of felines, thanks to the work of the Prop and Visual Effects Departments.
For this effect, one prop buyer journeyed all over London, acquiring and stacking hundreds of plates in the back of her tiny car. Then, one of the Second Unit's most memorable days was filming all of the cats from white kittens to peculiar-looking hairless breeds with goldfish bowls, crystal balls, miniature witches hats and other cute props.
By using chroma green paint on the plates, the Visual Effects team was able to insert the cat footage during post-production.

Shades of Pink
As she gained more and more power at the Ministry of Magic, Dolores Umbridge's wardrobe got progressively pinker, as did the pink accents on the clothing of her workers.

People the world-over have been enchanted by the Harry Potter films for nearly a decade. The wonderful special effects and amazing creatures have made this iconic series beloved to both young and old - and now, for the first time, the doors are going to be opened for everyone at the studio where it first began. You'll have the chance to go behind-the-scenes and see many things the camera never showed. From breathtakingly detailed sets to stunning costumes, props and animatronics, Warner Bros. Studio Tour London provides a unique showcase of the extraordinary British artistry, technology and talent that went into making the most successful film series of all time. Secrets will be revealed.

Warner Bros. Studio Tour London provides an amazing new opportunity to explore the magic of the Harry Potter films - the most successful film series of all time. This unique walking tour takes you behind-the-scenes and showcases a huge array of beautiful sets, costumes and props. It also reveals some closely guarded secrets, including facts about the special effects and animatronics that made these films so hugely popular all over the world.

Here are just some of the things you can expect to see and do:
- Step inside and discover the actual Great Hall.
- Explore Dumbledore’s office and discover never-before-seen treasures.
- Step onto the famous cobbles of Diagon Alley, featuring the shop fronts of Ollivanders wand shop, Flourish and Blotts, the Weasleys' Wizard Wheezes, Gringotts Wizarding Bank and Eeylops Owl Emporium.
- See iconic props from the films, including Harry’s Nimbus 2000 and Hagrid’s motorcycle.
- Learn how creatures were brought to life with green screen effects, animatronics and life-sized models.
- Rediscover other memorable sets from the film series, including the Gryffindor common room, the boys’ dormitory, Hagrid’s hut, Potion’s classroom and Professor Umbridge’s office at the Ministry of Magic.

Located just 20 miles from the heart of London at Warner Bros. Studios Leavesden, the very place where it all began and where all eight of the Harry Potter films were brought to life. The Studio Tour is accessible to everyone and promises to be a truly memorable experience - whether you’re an avid Harry Potter fan, an all-round movie buff or you just want to try something that’s a little bit different.

The tour is estimated to take approximately three hours (I was in there for 5 hours!), however, as the tour is mostly self guided, you are free to explore the attraction at your own pace. During this time you will be able to see many of the best-loved sets and exhibits from the films. Unique and precious items from the films will also be on display, alongside some exciting hands-on interactive exhibits that will make you feel like you’re actually there.

The magic also continues in the Gift Shop, which is full of exciting souvenirs and official merchandise, designed to create an everlasting memory of your day at Warner Bros. Studio Tour London.

Hogwarts Castle Model - Get a 360 degree view of the incredible, hand sculpted 1:24 scale construction that features within the Studio Tour. The Hogwarts castle model is the jewel of the Art Department having been built for the first film, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone. It took 86 artists and crew members to construct the first version which was then rebuilt and altered many times over for the next seven films. The work was so extensive that if one was to add all the man hours that have gone into building and reworking the model, it would come to over 74 years. The model was used for aerial photography, and was digitally scanned for CGI scenes.

The model, which sits at nearly 50 feet in diameter, has over 2,500 fibre optic lights that simulate lanterns and torches and even gave the illusion of students passing through hallways in the films. To show off the lighting to full effect a day-to-night cycle will take place every four minutes so you can experience its full beauty.

An amazing amount of detail went into the making of the model: all the doors are hinged, real plants are used for landscaping and miniature birds are housed in the Owlery. To make the model appear even more realistic, artists rebuilt miniature versions of the courtyards from Alnwick Castle and Durham Cathedral, where scenes from Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone were shot.


The Making of Harry Potter 29-05-2012
accent car photo
Image by Karen Roe
Umbridge's Ministry of Magic Office
Dolores Umbridge's Ministry of Magic office in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 1 retains many of Umbridge's nuances that were featured in her Defence Against the Dark Arts office at Hogwarts in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. Among these are her gaudy pink motif and her love of ornate furniture, which set decorators found at a Middle Eastern furniture shop tucked away in North London.

The Kitten Plates
Umbridge's decorative plates scampered to life with dozens of felines, thanks to the work of the Prop and Visual Effects Departments.
For this effect, one prop buyer journeyed all over London, acquiring and stacking hundreds of plates in the back of her tiny car. Then, one of the Second Unit's most memorable days was filming all of the cats from white kittens to peculiar-looking hairless breeds with goldfish bowls, crystal balls, miniature witches hats and other cute props.
By using chroma green paint on the plates, the Visual Effects team was able to insert the cat footage during post-production.

Shades of Pink
As she gained more and more power at the Ministry of Magic, Dolores Umbridge's wardrobe got progressively pinker, as did the pink accents on the clothing of her workers.

People the world-over have been enchanted by the Harry Potter films for nearly a decade. The wonderful special effects and amazing creatures have made this iconic series beloved to both young and old - and now, for the first time, the doors are going to be opened for everyone at the studio where it first began. You'll have the chance to go behind-the-scenes and see many things the camera never showed. From breathtakingly detailed sets to stunning costumes, props and animatronics, Warner Bros. Studio Tour London provides a unique showcase of the extraordinary British artistry, technology and talent that went into making the most successful film series of all time. Secrets will be revealed.

Warner Bros. Studio Tour London provides an amazing new opportunity to explore the magic of the Harry Potter films - the most successful film series of all time. This unique walking tour takes you behind-the-scenes and showcases a huge array of beautiful sets, costumes and props. It also reveals some closely guarded secrets, including facts about the special effects and animatronics that made these films so hugely popular all over the world.

Here are just some of the things you can expect to see and do:
- Step inside and discover the actual Great Hall.
- Explore Dumbledore’s office and discover never-before-seen treasures.
- Step onto the famous cobbles of Diagon Alley, featuring the shop fronts of Ollivanders wand shop, Flourish and Blotts, the Weasleys' Wizard Wheezes, Gringotts Wizarding Bank and Eeylops Owl Emporium.
- See iconic props from the films, including Harry’s Nimbus 2000 and Hagrid’s motorcycle.
- Learn how creatures were brought to life with green screen effects, animatronics and life-sized models.
- Rediscover other memorable sets from the film series, including the Gryffindor common room, the boys’ dormitory, Hagrid’s hut, Potion’s classroom and Professor Umbridge’s office at the Ministry of Magic.

Located just 20 miles from the heart of London at Warner Bros. Studios Leavesden, the very place where it all began and where all eight of the Harry Potter films were brought to life. The Studio Tour is accessible to everyone and promises to be a truly memorable experience - whether you’re an avid Harry Potter fan, an all-round movie buff or you just want to try something that’s a little bit different.

The tour is estimated to take approximately three hours (I was in there for 5 hours!), however, as the tour is mostly self guided, you are free to explore the attraction at your own pace. During this time you will be able to see many of the best-loved sets and exhibits from the films. Unique and precious items from the films will also be on display, alongside some exciting hands-on interactive exhibits that will make you feel like you’re actually there.

The magic also continues in the Gift Shop, which is full of exciting souvenirs and official merchandise, designed to create an everlasting memory of your day at Warner Bros. Studio Tour London.

Hogwarts Castle Model - Get a 360 degree view of the incredible, hand sculpted 1:24 scale construction that features within the Studio Tour. The Hogwarts castle model is the jewel of the Art Department having been built for the first film, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone. It took 86 artists and crew members to construct the first version which was then rebuilt and altered many times over for the next seven films. The work was so extensive that if one was to add all the man hours that have gone into building and reworking the model, it would come to over 74 years. The model was used for aerial photography, and was digitally scanned for CGI scenes.

The model, which sits at nearly 50 feet in diameter, has over 2,500 fibre optic lights that simulate lanterns and torches and even gave the illusion of students passing through hallways in the films. To show off the lighting to full effect a day-to-night cycle will take place every four minutes so you can experience its full beauty.

An amazing amount of detail went into the making of the model: all the doors are hinged, real plants are used for landscaping and miniature birds are housed in the Owlery. To make the model appear even more realistic, artists rebuilt miniature versions of the courtyards from Alnwick Castle and Durham Cathedral, where scenes from Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone were shot.

1 comments:

Get daily ideas and methods for generating $1,000s per day ONLINE totally FREE.
GET FREE ACCESS INSTANLY

Post a Comment

Share

Twitter Delicious Facebook Digg Stumbleupon Favorites More